THEMA: Botswana hebt Jagdverbot auf
26 Mai 2019 06:38 #557420
  • GinaChris
  • GinaChriss Avatar
  • Beiträge: 1797
  • Dank erhalten: 2869
  • GinaChris am 26 Mai 2019 06:38
  • GinaChriss Avatar
Was Präsident Masisi zur Aufhebung des Jagdverbotes zu sagen hat:

Mokgweetsi E. K. Masisi
21 Std. ·
WHY WE LIFTED THE BAN ON ELEPHANT HUNTING.

When my Government announced earlier this week [Thursday, May 23] that Botswana would be lifting its ban on elephant hunting, many people around the world, but especially in the U.S. and the UK, reacted with shock and horror. How could we do such a thing? What could possibly justify the wholesale slaughter of such noble and intelligent creatures? Is it really true that we intend to turn these magnificent animals into dog food?
All of these questions, and many more like them that have been raised in recent days, are understandable—understandable but misguided. The fact is, we in Botswana who live with and alongside the elephants yield to no one in our affection and concern for them, and we would never condone, no less promote, any of the terrible things those questions imply are in the offing. So let me explain what it is we are doing, and why.

To begin with, while it is true that we are lifting the ban on hunting, we are doing so in an extremely limited, tightly controlled fashion. We are not engaging in anything remotely like the culling of our elephant herds, and we are definitely not going to be using any elephants for pet food. Rather, after extensive consultations with local communities, scientists, and leaders of neighboring African states, we decided on a course of action that embodies three guiding principles—the need to conserve Botswana’s natural resources, the need to facilitate human-wildlife co-existence, and the need to promote scientific management of the country’s elephants and other wildlife species.

The hunting ban was originally put in place in 2014, ostensibly as a temporary measure, in response to reports of declines in some animal populations. But Botswana’s elephant population wasn’t at risk. To the contrary, while the number of elephants in all of Africa has been declining, Botswana’s elephant population has been exploding—from 50,000 or so in 1991 to more than 130,000 today—far more than Botswana’s fragile environment, already stressed by drought and other effects of climate change, can safely accommodate.
With elephants moving out of their usual range in search of food and water, there has been a sharp increase in the number of dangerous human-elephant interactions, one result of which has been widespread destruction of crops, livestock, and property. In the north, marauding elephants have slashed maize yields by three-quarters.

As an expert at the World Wildlife Fund recently noted, “A year’s livelihood can be destroyed in one or two nights by crop-raiding elephants.” Even worse, people have been injured and even killed by elephants roaming freely across Botswana’s unfenced parks and rural areas.

Adding to the problem is a sense of deep unhappiness about the hunting ban among rural people who felt they weren’t consulted when the ban was first imposed. Combined with the destructive impact of elephant overpopulation, this has transformed rural people’s traditional concern for wildlife into resentment, leading many to take up poaching.

So this is the problem that lifting the ban seeks to address. It’s not that the ban caused the huge increase in our elephant population. It’s that it has allowed elephants to move with impunity into once-hazardous inhabited areas, thus increasing the number of human-elephant conflicts and, not incidentally, the environmental and economic challenges faced by rural people.

The need to do something about the escalating level of human-elephant conflict was a central theme of the Kasane Elephant Summit I recently hosted for the leaders of Angola, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Collectively, the five southern African countries are home to more than 260 000 elephants in what we call the Kavango Zambezi Trans-frontier Area, and at our meeting we agreed that assuring the future of elephants in our region depends on our ability to ensure that elephants are an economic benefit, not a burden, to those who live side by side with them. To this end, we in Botswana will be encouraging community-based organizations and trusts to emphasize natural-resource conservation and tourism. Thus, we will be allocating more than half the elephant licenses we grant to local communities and instituting a series of strong measures designed to guarantee local people far more than just menial jobs, but rather a significant ownership stake in the tourism industry.

In this way, we will restore the elephant’s economic value of elephants to rural populations. In turn, this will provide local communities with a strong incentive to protect elephants and other wildlife from habitat loss, poaching, and anything else that threatens their survival. In short, as they realize the economic benefits of wildlife resources, local communities will become increasingly committed to sustainable wildlife management and conservation—a commitment that will benefit both Botswana’s people and Botswana’s elephants.

Quelle: fb Mokgweetsi E. K. Masisi
Gruß Gina
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: Rajang, freshy, Logi
26 Mai 2019 09:24 #557428
  • GinaChris
  • GinaChriss Avatar
  • Beiträge: 1797
  • Dank erhalten: 2869
  • GinaChris am 26 Mai 2019 06:38
  • GinaChriss Avatar
OT

Simbabwe erlaubt Büffeljagd mit Pfeil und Bogen
Simbabwe will Jägern erlauben, Büffel künftig mit Pfeil und Bogen zu erlegen. Damit solle „unser Produkt“ breiter aufgestellt werden, um „mehr Menschen nach Simbabwe zu locken“, sagte gestern ein Sprecher der Park- und Wildtiermanagementbehörde. Die daraus entstehenden Einnahmen würden zurück in den Umweltschutz gesteckt, erklärte er.

Die Zahl der Büffel in Simbabwe geht in die Hunderttausende. Die Tierwelt des südafrikanischen Landes zieht bereits jetzt Touristen und Jäger aus den USA, Europa und Südafrika an. Der wohl bekannteste Wildpark ist Hwange an der Grenze zu Botswana. Dort hatte ein Wilderer aus den Vereinigten Staaten 2015 den bekannten Löwen Cecil mit Pfeil und Bogen erschossen.

Lukrativer Markt
Der Markt für wohlhabende Jäger auf der Suche nach Trophäen wird in Afrika zunehmend umkämpfter. Am Mittwoch hatte Simbabwes Nachbar Botswana einen fünfjähriges Verbot der Elefantenjagd aufgehoben.

Simbabwe hatte diesen Monat mitgeteilt, dass es in den vergangenen sechs Jahren knapp hundert Elefanten für insgesamt 2,7 Millionen Dollar (2,4 Millionen Euro) an China und Dubai verkauft habe. Das Land begründete dies mit einer Überbevölkerung an Elefanten.

red, ORF.at/Agenturen

Quelle: orf.at/#/stories/3124351/
Gruß Gina
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: freshy, Logi
19 Jul 2019 07:34 #562205
  • GinaChris
  • GinaChriss Avatar
  • Beiträge: 1797
  • Dank erhalten: 2869
  • GinaChris am 26 Mai 2019 06:38
  • GinaChriss Avatar
BWgovernment
17 Std. ·
RESIDENTS APPLAUD RE-INTRODUCTION OF CONTROLLED HUNTING

Minister for Environment, Tourism and Natural Resources Conservation Mr Kitso Makaila says controlled hunting is to be re-introduced in 2020.

Addressing residents of Khwai and Mababe recently, Mr Mokaila said the Department of Wildlife and National Parks had completed the guidelines for the controlled hunting.

The guidelines, he said would be given to all stakeholders to appreciate hence the controlled hunting would effect in 2020.

Mr Mokaila also said the government would keep on engaging the international bodies on the lifting hunting ban.

Residents of Mababe thanked the government for lifting the hunting ban.

One resident Mr Nkatogang Sebinelo observed that the Mababe Zokotsama Development Trust had made losses since the introduction of hunting ban in 2014.

Mr Sebinelo therefore said the recent move to lift hunting ban by government was a positive development for Mababe residents.

He further requested that the communities be familiarised with the hunting model and value of the products.

Another Mababe resident Ms Kutlwano Russel said the residents were grateful for the new developments in the Ministry of Environment, Tourism and Natural Resources Conservation such as re-introduction of controlled hunting and reviewing the Land Bank Policy.

Mr Kgotlaetsile Pekenene also thanked the minister for bringing positive changes.

However, he said there were no campsites for individuals in Mababe which reversed the government’s efforts of inclusion of locals in the tourism industry.

Mr Opelo Tumelo decried that some youth were long given certificates by the land board for tourism operations which were subsequently frozen since Mababe was said to be state land. In his response, Tawana

Land Board Chairperson Mr Emmanuel Dube said he would take the matter of those who were given certificates but had projects frozen with the Ministry of Land Management, Water and Sanitation services headquarters. BOPA

Quelle: fb BWgovernment
Gruß Gina
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: speed66, Logi, loser
19 Jul 2019 09:48 #562226
  • loser
  • losers Avatar
  • Beiträge: 683
  • Dank erhalten: 1063
  • loser am 19 Jul 2019 09:48
  • losers Avatar
Ich schreib‘s hierher, würde aber auch zum „Elefantenmanagement“-Thema passen.
Die PHs in Botswana haben schon vor Jahren darauf hingewiesen, dass sie (bzw. die Trophäenjagd) keine BESTANDSKONTROLLE/REDUZIERUNG leisten können oder wollen. Die paar hundert Tiere auf Lizenz jährlich sind peanuts gemessen am Bestand und Erforderlichen.
Der eigentliche Zweck der jetzigen Maßnahme ist und war nie die zahlenmäßige Bestandsregulierung sondern es ist eine „Lenkungsmaßnahme“ um die Elefanten am Abwandern aus Schutzgebieten in besiedelte Regionen zu hindern. Zusätzlich und natürlich wurde Einkommen, Beschäftigung und Fleisch für die Landbevölkerung generiert*), Einkommen für die „Jagdwirtschaft“ sowieso. Das Konzept, Schutzgebiete mit Jagdgebieten zu umgeben, ist alt und erprobt und hatte einen guten Grund. Aber die Khamas wussten alles besser.
Außerdem haben die Lizenzinhaber Bohrlöcher in ihren Gebieten betrieben, die Großwild vor Ort gehalten haben. Nach deren Aufgabe sind die Tiere in die Schutzgebiete mit dauerhaftem Wasser und in besiedelte Regionen abgewandert und haben dort den Bevölkerungsdruck erhöht und Konfliktfälle verursacht. Dass man hier ein Problem generiert hat wurde zwar bald erkannt, aber es fehlte das Geld für die Wiederinbetriebnahme der Brunnen. Vor ein paar Jahren hat der kleine Khama dann einen internationalen Hilferuf um Geld dafür ausgeschickt und es wurden ein paar Bohlöcher im Nordosten reaktiviert. Aber die Aktion war viel zu klein und kurzlebig.

BW hat das zwar jetzt rechtlich eingeleitet aber mE ist es noch offen, ob BW mit der geplanten Vergabe von Jagdlizenzen Erfolg haben wird. Die einschlägige NGO-Gegnerschaft ist aktiv und erfolgreich und lobbyiert in den reichen Heimatländern der Trophäenjäger gegen die Einfuhr der Trophäen, vom öffentlichen shitstorm gegen den Jäger mal gar nicht zu reden. Das ist genauso effektiv wie Khama’s Jagdverbot. Man wird sehen…..
Werner

*) 2013/14 hat ein PH (mit griechischem Namen?) anlässlich der Debatte über das Jagdverbot in der Ngami Times geschrieben, dass er jährlich etwa 1 Mio. US$ an Lizenzen an die communities zahlt, zusätzlich Fleisch, Abschuss ihrer Quoten und Beschäftigung. An so einer Lizenz hingen hunderte Existenzen.
Letzte Änderung: 19 Jul 2019 13:42 von loser.
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: freshy, Logi
19 Jul 2019 21:05 #562308
  • Rajang
  • Rajangs Avatar
  • Beiträge: 892
  • Dank erhalten: 475
  • Rajang am 19 Jul 2019 21:05
  • Rajangs Avatar
Hallo Loser,
Im Juni wurden bereits 'bekannte' Gesichter (Leute aus dem Trophäen Geschäft aus SA - die eigentlich keine Einreiseerlaubnis hätten für Botswana, aber via members of parliment doch reinkamen, welche das grosse Geschäft mit den Chinesen Jägern machen wollen) gesehen in den Sektoren CH1 und CH3 die selbständig mit den lokalen Chiefs probierten Kontakte aufzunehmen.
'Leider' gelangten sie an den falschen Mann (Mike Gunn) welcher alle Hebel, incl. via den früheren Präsidenten, in Bewegung setzte.

Im Oktober sind Wahlen in Botswana. Der frühere Präsident hat die regierende Partei verlassen (welche durch seinen Vater gegründet wurde) und sich der Opposition angeschlossen - welche gegen eine Wiederaufnahme der Jagd ist. Es rumort gewaltig im Lande im Moment.
Also: Kapitalkräftige Interessenten für die Jagd scheinen vorhanden zu sein.... :evil:

Gruss Rajang
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: Logi, GinaChris, loser
19 Jul 2019 21:22 #562311
  • loser
  • losers Avatar
  • Beiträge: 683
  • Dank erhalten: 1063
  • loser am 19 Jul 2019 09:48
  • losers Avatar
hallo Rajang, klar dass auch das in diese Richtung läuft/laufen wird. Ein großer beschnitzter Zahn hat dort einen Millionen$ Endverkaufswert. Elfenbein ist großes Geschäft und Geldanlage.
Aber unbedingt danke für die interessante Information. Wenn mehr davon, keep them coming.
Werner
@Khama war in den Medien
PS: Hallo Rajang, CH1 ist auf meiner Kart keine WMA, hat sich das geändert?
Letzte Änderung: 19 Jul 2019 22:01 von loser.
Der Administrator hat öffentliche Schreibrechte deaktiviert.
Folgende Benutzer bedankten sich: Logi